Brisbane weather updates

Drought-ravaged NSW and Queensland are receiving storms and heavy rain. Courtesy: Brisbane Times

Wet weather caused chaos for commuters and dumped more than 200 millimetres of rain across some parts of southern Queensland on Thursday, during the peak of a system that quickly slipped south of the border.

A total of 106 millimetres recorded in Brisbane’s east at Lytton was the highest rainfall in the state’s south-east. Near the airport, Luggage Point had a total of 104 millimetres.

The early-morning downpour stranded motorists on one South Brisbane road and flooded a number of others, leading to crashes, hour-long bus delays through the city and leaving almost 5000 homes and buildings without power across the south-east.

A combination of lingering troughs means the rain is set to remain over parts of the state into next week, including the south-east, with another peak forecast for the region on Monday.

The early-morning downpour stranded motorists on one South Brisbane road and flooded a number of others, leading to crashes, hour-long bus delays through the city and leaving almost 5000 homes and buildings without power across the south-east.

A combination of lingering troughs means the rain is set to remain over parts of the state into next week, including the south-east, with another peak forecast for the region on Monday.

The early-morning downpour stranded motorists on one South Brisbane road and flooded a number of others, leading to crashes, hour-long bus delays through the city and leaving almost 5000 homes and buildings without power across the south-east.

A combination of lingering troughs means the rain is set to remain over parts of the state into next week, including the south-east, with another peak forecast for the region on Monday.

“We’ll take all we can get,” Cr Curran said.

Ms Wong said drought-stricken parts of the state further inland had also experienced some well-needed rain.

The Toowoomba region had received 20 to 30 millimetres over the previous 24 hours, along with 10 to 20 millimetres across parts of the wider Darling Downs.

A new upper trough set to “amplify” over the state at the weekend would bring heavy rainfall totals to the southern interior of the state, east of Charleville.

The heavier falls would then shift again back to the south-east for a “wet day” on Monday, Ms Wong said.

In a statement, Brisbane lord mayor Adrian Schrinner told residents to plan ahead, as the forecast and recent rain was set to combine with higher-than-normal tides and bring potential flooding to bayside, riverside and low-lying areas.

A flood warning remained in place for potential minor flooding of the Mary River downstream from Gympie, with others still in place for major and moderate flooding throughout the state’s north and western interior.

Source: BrisbaneTimes.com.au